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Sponsor an Animal at CROW

By sponsoring one of CROW’s wildlife patient’s rehabilitation and release you will be playing a direct role in ensuring that animal gets a second chance at a free life back in the wild.

As a CROW Animal Sponsor you will receive:

  • A personalized sponsorship e-certificate
  • A digital image of your sponsored animal
  • A detailed fact sheet on both your sponsored animal and its species
  • Update reports on your sponsored animal’s recovery and progress

Your monthly sponsorship fee will be used to cover the costs of your animal’s care and treatment as well as their release back into the wild. These costs will include your animal’s food, housing and medical treatment.

Sponsorship Fees:

Raptors R 80 per month
Mammals R 90 per month
Antelope R100 per month
Primates R 90 per month
Reptiles R 50 per month

Below you will meet some of the animals that are currently in need of sponsorship at our centre. Click the "READ MORE" button to see the full story.

MAMMALS

Flash
Sumo & Senzi
Ash, Berry, Bear and Cloud
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Flash’s Story
Name: Flash
Species: Tortoise
Age:  
Gender: Male

Flash’s Story
Flash the tortoise was sadly abused by a member of the public. He was hit on his shell and the people who found him tried to chain him to a pole. He has been with CROW for 10 years.

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Sumo & Senzi’s Story
Name: Sumo & Senzi
Species: Servals (Leptailurus serval)
Age: One week-old as at 25th August 2015
Gender: Male & Female

Sumo & Senzi’s Story
Sumo and Senzi were discovered abandoned in the open veld by local farm workers in the Vryheid area in late August 2015. Still blind and just a week-old at the time, the two tiny kittens were extremely weak and dehydrated and it was clear that had been without their mother for some time. Thankfully, the farmer phoned CROW straight away and our team were able to race up to get them.

Once safely back at the CROW centre, Sumo and Senzi were given fluids and put straight onto a strict 2-hourly feeding schedule by CROW Clinic Nurse, Sue-Ann Shutte. Under Sue-Ann’s expert care, both Sumo and Senzi doubled in size within a week and their eyes and ears opened like clockwork at around 12 days-old.

With all CROW’s orphaned wildlife patients, it’s imperative that we follow the developmental timeframes and milestones in the wild as closely as possible. Hence, for Sumo and Senzi, this means they will continue to be bottle fed by Sue-Ann until they are approximately 5 months-old. During this time, they will have no interaction with any other people. With humans being the number one threat to servals, this is crucial to ensuring they do not lose their natural fear of people which will severely jeprodise their chances of survival back out in the wild. Hence while they will get used to Sue-Ann and allow her to get close to them, they will not be so trusting of other people.

Depending on their progress, Sumo and Senzi will be re-located to a large outdoor pre-release boma at their intended release site. Here they can hone their hunting skills and learn to fend for themselves. During this period, the CROW team will continue to keep a close eye on them and provide supplementary food. This will continue until such time as they are confidently hunting for themselves on the natural prey such as small rodents and birds that live in and around their boma. From past experience, this period can range from anything as little as a few weeks to a few months.

With servals currently listed as a TOP (Threatened or Protected) species in South Africa, it will be crucial for the CROW team to work with local wildlife authorities to identify a safe release site for Sumo and Senzi. Not only is it imperative that they are released in an area where they will be safe from humans, but hopefully where they have the best chance to breed with other servals in the area and contribute to the preservation of their magnificent species.

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Ash, Berry, Bear and Cloud’s Story
Name: Ash, Berry, Bear and Cloud
Species: Genets
Age: TBC
Gender:  

Ash, Berry, Bear and Cloud’s Story
This baby genet is one of three siblings that were rescued from a construction site in the Upper Highway area in October. CROW Clinic Nurse, Kelly, who is well versed in genet rehabilitation, has been charged with their care and ensuring they get all the feeds necessary to ensure they grow at an optimal rate. The four genets are known affectionately known as Ash, Berry, Bear and Cloud. They will be housed together which helps to minimize human interaction and ensure they retain their natural fear of people. Pictured here is Cloud.

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Fay
Bumble Bee
Daisy
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Fay’s Story
Name: Fay
Species: Antelope
Age: 1 day old (August 2016)
Gender: Female

Fay’s Story
Fay was admitted to CROW in August 2016 after she was found on the roadside near King Shaka International Airport. Less than 24-hours old when she arrived at CROW, she is now thriving in our specialised baby antelope enclosure.

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Bumble Bee ‘s Story
Name: Bumble Bee
Species: Squirrel
Age: 10 weeks old (January 2017)
Gender: Male

Bumble Bee’s Story
Bumble Bee, the squirrel, was brought to CROW in November by our Empangeni depot. This little fella was found orphaned in the St.Lucia area. His mother was moving her babies out of a nest and sadly Bumble Bee was left behind. It is likely something scarred his mother and her instincts of ‘fight or flight’ kicked in. Now 10 weeks old, Bumble Bee is doing well here at CROW and will soon have be transferred to a larger enclosure. This specialised enclosure will mimic his natural environment.

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Daisy’s Story
Name: Daisy
Species: Genet
Age:  
Gender: Female

Daisy’s Story
Pictured here is Daisy, a genet that was recently admitted to CROW. On her admission to the centre, Daisy was severally emaciated. Thanks to CROW Clinic Nurse Kelly Wilyman who is well versed at genet rehabilitation, Daisy is on the mend, getting strong and eating well. In this photograph, you can see Daisy exploring her surroundings.

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BIRDS OF PREY

None at the moment.

PRIMATES

Skipper
Emma
Opal
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Skipper’s Story
Name: Skipper
Species: Vervet Monkey
Age: 4 days old (September 2016)
Gender: Male

Skipper’s Story
Skipper, the Vervet monkey is the first orphaned monkey to be admitted to CROW for the 2016/2017 Baby Season. At 4-days old he was brought to CROW in September from FreeMe Wildlife Rehabilitation KZN in Howick, after a member of the public found the baby monkey in their garden. Sadly, Skipper’s mother was found dead due to complications.

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Emma’s Story
Name: Emma
Species: Chacma Baboon (Papio Ursinus)
Age: 3 months old (as at July 2014)
Gender: Female

Emma’s Story
Little Emma was only 2 months-old when she became an orphan. Tragically, Emma was found lying next to the lifeless body of her mother who had been snared in a gin trap in the Underberg area.

Since her arrival at CROW, Emma has been in the 24 hour care of Primate Manager, Mabel Watts. Emma is a very independent and curious baby baboon who is full of character. Emma is currently being introduced to a troop of younger baboons here at the CROW centre, with which she spends in increasing amount of time every day. Should all continue to go well with her rehabilitation Emma is expected to be fully integrated with the troop by the end of September 2014.

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Opal’s Story
Name: Opal
Species: Vervet Monkey
Age: 6 days old (September 2016)
Gender: Female

Opal’s Story
Opal, was rescued by the CROW clinic team in the Durban South area in September, after her mother was run over by a car. Weighing in at 430g and just 6-days old when she was admitted, Opal was still clinging to her mother when we found her next to the road.

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Bo
Peanut
Khaleesi
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Bo’s Story
Name: Bo
Species: Vervet Monkey
Age: 6 weeks old (January 2017)
Gender: Male

Bo’s Story
Baby Season is in full swing here at CROW. Meet Bo, a 6-week-old baby Vervet monkey who was rescued by CROW’s clinic team from the Bluff in early January. Unfortunately, Bo’s mother was run over by a car and when she was struck by the car, Bo let go of his mother and sought safety in a nearby tree. It took CROW’s team 2 hours to get the baby monkey close to the rescue cage so we could transfer him to the centre. After a successful rescue, Bo will now begin a 3-year rehabilitation process at CROW, which will see him become a member of a troop.

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Peanut’s Story
Name: Peanut
Species: Vervet Monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus)
Age: 5 days-old (as at 26th September 2015)
Gender: Male

Peanut’s Story
Peanut was just a few days-old when he and his mother had to be rescued by the CROW team in late September 2015. A member of the public alerted CROW to their plight after they saw Peanut’s mother lying on the side of a road in the Amanzimtoti area where she was clearly in a severe amount of pain.

Peanut’s mother had been electrocuted by an electric fence and had sustained horrific burns to her hands and feet as a result. Sadly, due to the extent of her injuries, the decision was made to end her suffering and she was put to sleep shortly after she arrived at the CROW centre.

Little Peanut is now being professionally hand-reared by CROW’s Primate Officer. Understandably scared and traumatized at first, he has since settled into his new routine in CROW’s Primate Nursery. Here Peanut is being joined by more and more injured and orphaned monkeys as the 2015 baby season progresses.

Once he is fully weaned, Peanut along with CROW’s other Spring 2015 vervet babies will be moved to a large outdoor enclosure at the centre where they will slowly be introduced to some of the older vervet monkey patients that are also being rehabilitated. Only once Peanut and his new family have fully bonded, will they be released back into the wild at a safe location as far from people and electric fences as possible.

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Khaleesi’s Story
Name: Khaleesi
Species: Chacma Baboon
Age: 3 days old
Gender: Female

Khaleesi’s Story
Meet 3-day old baby Chacma Baboon, Khaleesi who was found abandoned in the Hluhluwe area. Weighing in at a mere 950g, Khaleesi was emaciated and her little body was covered in ticks. Pictured here, you can see Khaleesi is looking healthy and strong. She will be under the expert care of Primate Manager Mabel Watts in our nursery for a while, before she is released into the larger baboon enclosure.

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